Young Adult Dark Urban Fantasy Author ~

Reading

How important is the Title?

What role does a title play in the overall feel of a book? Does it pull at your heart-strings, begging you to pick it up or is the cover more important as a draw?

Since I am now in the position of weighing my options in regard to changing my title (or clinging to it with both hands), I’ve given the whole process quite a bit of thought.

There are a good amount of book titles out there that have little or no relevance to story content. Good books. Books that I’m sure had original titles, titles that fit and worked, only to be changed in order to draw more readers.

In the YA fantasy/paranormal genre they seem more prevalent. So here’s the question: Should the title represent the story? Or should the aim of a title be to draw more readers regardless of its relevance to the book?

Example: Twilight. Stephenie Meyer intended the first book of this series to be titled FORKS. It represented the town obviously, but it also represented where Bella was in her life. Stuck at various cross-roads, trying to do the right thing, make the right decisions. Put aside the fact the we are all comfortable, and there for biased to the Twilight title, and ask yourself if it really works. Does it have any real relevance to the story? It makes a great sounding book. It fits the cover nicely. It sold millions of copies.

How about Beautiful Creatures (Darkness and Chaos), a favorite series of mine, by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl. These books are magical and dark and delicious. They also have a different title. The original one. SIXTEEN MOONS (and Seventeen and Eighteen). Titles that fit beautifully with the storyline. But those titles aren’t the ones we see.

How about JK Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows? Pretty clear that her titles (and covers) could not be more perfectly matched to the story.

Michael Scott‘s The Alchemist? The Magician? All the titles in this incredible series are also wonderfully in sync with both story line and book covers.

That all being said, I am assuming it’s the romantic paranormal side of YA that tends to fall to luring titles, regardless of story content. Pretty covers sell. Put a catchy title on that pretty cover and you just increased your odds of selling a book.

So, what do you think? Choose the title that fits the storyline and hope it appeals to your readers? Choose the title that grips you as the writer from the start? Or choose a title (and cover) that targets your genre regardless of relevance to the book?

I know, I know. Be savvy enough to meld them all (EXCEPT relevance, I can’t move past that). Just answer the question;) 


But….wait…that’s MY title!

Yep, after a year and a half, my title has been taken. *sigh*

It’s a good title, a title that fits beautifully with the story. I can’t even wrap my head around changing it.

Now what?


National Author’s Day

For National Authors Day I shall be working here at my desk (no it never looks so neat).

My desk

Here are just a few of my favorite authors who must be mentioned today: The splendidly dark and incredibly talented, Anne Rice.

Anne Rice

Image via Wikipedia Anne Rice

The Mastermind, J.R.R. Tolkien.

Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army unif...

Image via Wikipedia Tolkien

And of course, The Legend in her own time, JK Rowling.

J. K. Rowling, after receiving an honorary deg...

Image via Wikipedia JK Rowling

There are many more I could add, but these take the top. Good luck to all you NanoWrimo writers starting today as well!


My Vice

Here it is, my latest vice. It has wrapped itself around me in a strangle hold.

George R. R. Martin. A Storm Of Swords:

                                                                 (Via Wikipedia)

I simply cannot put this series of books down. A must read for any fantasy fan (BEFORE you watch the TV series mind you). I’m not a fan of spoiler reviews so I won’t go into length here other than to say, these stories pull you in and refuse to let go. Highly addicting and time well spent.

Game Of Thrones (#1)

A Clash Of Kings (#2)

A Storm Of Swords (#3)

A Feast For Crows (#4)

And the long-awaited A Dance With Dragons (#5) released July 2011

There are said to be 7 planned novels in this series, A Song Of Ice And Fire.


I don’t read.

I tried not to squawk or burst out laughing or stare. But as I sat quietly, my head shot up and I did stare. And I’m almost sure I shook my head, rolled my eyes and in some other way, incriminated myself, as I gawked in total disbelief at two women having conversation in the local hair salon.

I fidgeted in my chair and attempted to look normal, crossing and un-crossing my legs, wanting desperately to stand up and say: “What do you mean, you don’t read? Are you INSANE?” But I didn’t do that. No, I did what any other respectable writer would do, I yanked out my iPhone and began filling my notes app with their conversation.

“Oh gosh no, I just can’t concentrate for that long. I mean some books are 500 pages! Who has time for that?” She went on. “Really though, even if I did have the time, why would I want to read a book that long? I’ve got better things to do.”

WOW.

Even if I wasn’t a writer and a voracious reader, I still would have been speechless. Seriously? Reading is a waste of time??

It got me thinking.

The perception of reading is a varied one. One that is generally learned from childhood. If you are introduced to reading in a positive way as a child, you are more likely to love reading as an adult. If not..well, you’re missing out on a truly incredible part of life.

One of the main reasons, if not the main reason I read so much, is because of my mom who ALWAYS reads. She recommends books, passes them down to me and had me reading novels at a very young age. I was taught to love books by example. And what an important example it was and continues to be. I wouldn’t be a writer if I didn’t have a genuine love for books.

So although it has been said before, I have to say it again, hats off to JK Rowling and Stephanie Meyer for gaining an enormous wealth of young readers. Regardless of whether you are or aren’t a Harry Potter or Twilight fan, these authors both did something very special.

They got millions of kids to read. Millions. And they changed the view of reading from something kids thought was a boring waste, to something they thought was cool and important and fun.

They changed the way generations of kids view books.

And thank goodness for that because as writers we need as many readers as we can possibly get.