Young Adult Dark Urban Fantasy Author ~

Posts tagged “Novel

What The New Year Holds …

Happy New Year 2013

Happy New Year 2013 (Photo credit: sangak)

Happy 2013, everyone! I’m so excited about the new year.

TIED, the first book in The Fire Born Novels series, will be released September 9! And in preparation of that upcoming event, my blog will be undergoing a few changes.

In January I will be hosting an interview with fellow author, L.S. Murphy about her upcoming release, REAPER, a young adult paranormal romance/urban fantasy. I will also have a special cover reveal for fellow author, J.A Belfield’s upcoming release, CAGED.

In March I will host fellow author, Aimee Lane, for her SILENT ECHOES blog tour.

In addition, marketing will begin for the release of TIED, which will include the cover release, blurb, excerpts and more!

Hold on tight, the ride’s about to get bumpy!

 


Anything Is Possible …

“Anything is possible if you’ve got enough nerve.”

~ J. K. Rowling

English: J. K. Rowling, after receiving an hon...

English: J. K. Rowling, after receiving an honorary degree from The University of Aberdeen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


SQUEE!

UPCOMING NEWS IS ON THE WAY REGARDING TIED!   *SQUEEEE*

Gemini at Cedar Point is a steel hybrid roller...

Gemini at Cedar Point is a steel hybrid roller coaster using steel track on a wooden structure. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


The Website Launch

TheFireBornNovels.com is officially up and running. Small in size and content still, but up and running nonetheless. 😉


The Indie/Trad Debate. Why Are We Still Talking About This?

Writer Wordart

Writer Wordart (Photo credit: MarkGregory007)

It occurs to me after reading yet another scalding blog post by another author who is upset by the current state of the publishing industry, that we as a whole of writers need to stop engaging in the ‘who’s on the right or left side of the fence’ argument.

I know that we all get emotional and heated up and mad. It keeps the fire burning. It fuels the “I’ll show them!” mentality on both sides. By my god, this topic is OLD. And frustrating. And Petty.

So why, why are we still talking about it? Why are we still reading scathing posts that are meant to infuriate?

You wanna go Trad? GO TRAD!

You wanna go Indie? GO INDIE!

Who cares? Other than you, the author, it’s no one’s concern. No one’s business. People will always judge. Fact of life.

Your choices in publishing don’t need to be defended. Nor should anyone’s choices be ridiculed.

So let’s all shut up about who’s wrong and who’s right. Not all trad books are glazed in gold and not all indie books suck. Stop drawing an imaginary line in the imaginary sands of no where land. It doesn’t exist. Stop with the professional vs. amateur argument about indies ‘settling’ for second best because it’s all they could get vs. trads clinging to their sinking ship waving their credentials high above their heads.

Readers don’t care. This is a writers argument.

Readers want good stories. That’s it.

Self-pubbed, trad-pubbed. They don’t care.

Writers need to write good books and channel them in whatever direction they choose. Fact is, some writers are control freaks and the thought of giving up rights throws them into a backward tail spin. Others cannot fathom the idea of going it alone. They want the support that trad publishers provide.  There is no right choice. There is no wrong choice.

Are we all really going through the headaches of creating worlds and characters and plot lines to turn around and waste our precious time and energy demeaning other writers for the choices they make regarding how to publish? Really? That train of thought boils down to envy, jealousy… and FEAR. Let it go.

Write good books and leave the complaints at home. Spill them out there. To your dog. Or your cat. We are all wasting time yapping and pointing fingers. Not to mention making asses out of ourselves.

Our little blogosphere of writers here online—it’s not so small. We have a world-wide reach and those who are always gripping make the lot of us look bad.

Good day my fellow writers. Write On. Publish On. And remember the wise words of Author Chuck Wendig, “Try not to suck.”


To Outline Or…Not

English: Hot-swap states with transitions appl...

Image via Wikipedia

You had two roads to take, the gut instinct or the outline. You chose to write from your gut, let the story pour from your imagination onto the page. You didn’t think about where it was going because you knew it would get there. You’re 80,000 words in. Done. All feels great. Now what?

Now, Editing. You begin to go through your work chapter by chapter, detail by detail and you realize the transitions aren’t what they should be, could be, need to be or what you thought they were. Here is the biggest issue writing without an outline — headaches. You’ve got a great story but it doesn’t roll off your tongue quite right. It doesn’t work quite the way it sounded in your head.

Now for the rewrite. The biggest pain in the ass ever. It even trumps editing. And that is saying a lot. You rewrite from the beginning, move a paragraph here, a chapter there and think, okay, I can do this, it’s not so bad. Until it is bad. Until you have 30 chapters staring back at you asking to be properly read and all your thoughts become a jumbled, dizzying mess.

Now, let me start from the beginning. I’m not methodical. I’m a jumper. I get hit with an idea and I’m off. It’s my way, my style, my inspiration. But let me say that my style completely bit me in the ass. No outline is a bad idea.

I had notes. Pages and pages of notes, handwritten. I had documents–so many I couldn’t keep track of them all. In the beginning, I thought they were enough. In the end, they weren’t. Not even close. I had too many ideas. Ideas that I couldn’t reign in. Ideas that I couldn’t mold in the way I needed to—wanted to. I paid for those amateur mistakes in the end. Through rewrites, a staggering number of drafts, cuts, edits, and revisions. Close to two years worth.

Now my notes are in an abstract outline form, still free-flowing, but an outline nonetheless. Word to the wise: Get your idea, work it through and outline it. Even if that outline is as simple as a few sentences per chapter–a few ideas. Even if you only have a kernel of an idea of what the beginning, middle, and end of the story should be. In the end you will gain a ridiculous amount of time, a better story and with any luck, your sanity.


But….wait…that’s MY title!

Yep, after a year and a half, my title has been taken. *sigh*

It’s a good title, a title that fits beautifully with the story. I can’t even wrap my head around changing it.

Now what?


It’s time to perform.

One of the pieces of advice I remember most was given by my college dance instructor,”Laney, you’re one of those dancers who has all this talent but never comes to class.” She shook her head, I remember, as if I were driving her crazy and went on to say that I could do so much with my talent if I just put the time in.

Thing was, I’d been dancing my entire life. I’d put the time in. I’d busted my ass and now all I wanted to do was show it. I wanted to perform. And so I did. I put in hours and hours of rehearsal time every week, performed a few times a year and I loved it. I wasn’t interested in going to class. I knew the drill. I was happy in the now. I was performing and performing well and wasn’t THAT the point??

Apparently not.

For Ms. Alora, there was so much more that I was capable of. So much more I was losing out on. I was a good dancer. But in my instructors eyes, I could’ve been great. I was wasting my talent by not coming to class.

Sure I could’ve gone much further than I did. Busted my ass a little harder, hung in there a little longer. But, I was happy doing what I was doing.

Now, as I read everything under the sun in regard to publishing and honing the craft as a writer, I wonder, have I put in the time? Would my dance instructor say, “Laney, you need to keep studying. Don’t publish yet.”

After dancing for close to 16 years at the time of her first bit of advice, she still wanted more. I continued to dance for many years after that and I never forgot her words.

As I look at my completed novel, I wonder, should I study for a little longer? Bust my ass for a few more years?

Was Ms. Alora right?

I put in my time as a dancer. Years and years of it. And at the end of the day, I did what made me happy. That should count for something. When is it ok to trust that you’re on the right path for you?

No one can say whether or not I should have showed up for class more. Or that going along with what someone else thought was the right way to go–was indeed the right way. It was my way. I get to choose. And if I fail, then I fail–but at least I tried. At least I chose the road to travel–it wasn’t chosen for me.

I didn’t fail as a dancer because my path was different from what was expected–I excelled because I listened to what I thought was right.

All this second guessing surrounding the publishing industry is enough to drown new writers. Which way is up or down? Will people like my work? Will they destroy it with reviews?

But here’s the real question–Will you be happy or even content if you don’t publish your work? If it stays hidden in a drawer?

Why put in all that time and effort if you don’t plan to perform?

I mean, that’s the whole point. Isn’t it?


No to the prologue??

I like the prologue. It’s useful. Who cares if no one else reads them? I read them!

In YA, prologues are a no-no, or so everyone says. But they are everywhere. Out of the last few series of books I’ve read, approx. twelve out of fifteen books, had a prologue. So who’s right and who is reading the prologue? Besides me?

I know a lot of readers skip them and move to the action, but sometimes we need that beginning info to further understand the story. Who cares if it’s back story? Some stories, especially those that are historical or move back and forth through time, need back story.

Prologue thoughts? Opinions? Good, bad, don’t care?


Quote of the Day

“Whether we are describing a king, an assassin, a thief, an honest man, a prostitute, a nun, a young girl, or a stallholder in a market, it is always ourselves that we are describing.”
-Guy De Maupassant